Street Photography VII

The discussion of editing has been left till now because it is, to me, of lesser importance than the rest. But it is also logically what follows what has come before it. Only after we have been out taking pictures do we begin the work of editing. It is for that reason, as well, that the next section on telling stories through a body of work comes after this one. It is only after we have culled and edited that we can begin to curate the finished photos into a coherent story, ready to show to others. Continue reading

There is No Holy Grail for Better Photography, Only Hard Work

Photography, perhaps more than any other endeavour is replete with the equivalent of ‘get rich quick’ schemes. There are any number of software companies and individual photographers hawking ‘one click fix’ solutions. From snapshot to amazing shot-type books and tutorials. Action sets that will set your heart a flutter at the ease with which a couple mouse clicks will make your photo a masterpiece. Continue reading

Workflow – What is it good for?

If you read the musings here you’ll know that I like to co-opt song titles and lyrics. So, with a nod to Edwin Starr we’re going to talk about the idea of ‘workflow’.

What is workflow? It’s a term used a lot in photography but is it a term that people generally know what it means? Continue reading

Anatomy of a Restoration

Image restoration is a task that has been made easier in some ways with digital tools but even though it may be easier, it’s still not a 5 minute exercise as some may want to lead you to believe.  In a past article I discussed the process of recreating a photo of a mural that had been damaged.  That project took about 9 hours of editing time to complete.

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Old Buildings – A Recent Commercial Assignment

A lot of the commercial work I do is architectural.  Recently, I was hired by an architectural firm to shoot several of their projects.  One of those projects was a nearly 200 year old building.  As you might expect with a building that old, there had been modifications done, there had been additions, there had been repairs and there had been settling over time.  The work my client had done was converting the structure from industrial to mixed use commercial/residential.  This included work on the exterior, cleaning up the brickwork, adding new –  but period looking – detail and the design work on the interior.

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The Puzzle – A Recent Commercial Assignment

Recently I was hired by an architectural firm to photograph four mural panels at a local college.  The architects had been engaged to do some redesign work at the school.  Part of the redesign included covering up the murals.  The murals are mixed media pieces and include some relief elements on two of the panels.

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Image Blending With Luminance Masks

In a recent article we looked at using luminance and density masks as a tool for sharpening images.  Today we’re going to look at using luminance masks as a tool for blending images to extend dynamic range.  It’s a very slick trick and much easier than manual blending using layer masks and painting in the image. Continue reading

Sharpening Using Luminance & Density Masks

There are countless ways to sharpen an image.  Unsharp Mask, Smart Sharpen, High Pass.  A while back I wrote an article on sharpening using Smart Objects to make your sharpening more versatile.  Today we’re going to look at a different way of doing creative sharpening using luminance and density masks. Continue reading

Lightroom 4 Overview

As many know by now, Adobe has released the first public beta version of Lightroom 4.  For those not familiar, Lightroom is Adobe’s terrific Digital Asset Management/Image Editing application.  Each version has been stronger than the previous and LR4 is no different.  I’m going to cover a couple of the major changes in this article but won’t go into all of the new features. Continue reading

HDR: To Bracket or Not to Bracket….

….. if that is the question then the answer is: Bracket.  At least if you want the best of what HDR can give you.

There’s still a belief in some circles that taking a single image, making multiple copies of it with adjusted exposure settings and tossing those ‘fake brackets’ into the HDR cooker will produce different and better results than just tonemapping a single image. Some also think it’s as good as shooting an in camera bracket. Let’s dispell an HDR myth, shall we? Continue reading