Street Photography – Epilogue

Donald Weber wrote an essay in March 2015 on the state of photojournalism today. Weber is a World Press Photo juror and a member of VII Agency. Despite the problems World Press Photo has had in recent years, it remains a very prestigious competition.

In the essay, Weber lamented the death of photojournalism has he knew it and as he learned it. And he is correct. Continue reading

Street Photography VII

The discussion of editing has been left till now because it is, to me, of lesser importance than the rest. But it is also logically what follows what has come before it. Only after we have been out taking pictures do we begin the work of editing. It is for that reason, as well, that the next section on telling stories through a body of work comes after this one. It is only after we have culled and edited that we can begin to curate the finished photos into a coherent story, ready to show to others. Continue reading

Street Photography VI

The night is a very interesting time for photography in general and street photography in particular. Certainly the lighting is different. But more importantly, the people are different. It is a very different person who is out at night from the day. Even if it is the same person, they are different. The night is personal time. People who you might see during the day are more likely to be more relaxed at night. There is also a sector of the community that you probably will only see after the sun goes down. Continue reading

Of Ethics & Ethics – Photographic & Journalistic

The old saying is true. Opinions are like [insert specific anatomical reference], everybody has one. Witness the number of opinion columnists employed by newspapers and the number of pundits who appear regularly on other media outlets to expound at length about this, that, and any other thing. Like most any other endeavour, there are good and bad providers of opinion. What separates the two? Continue reading

Street Photography III

The camera is a shield. Even though you see everything through the viewfinder, you’re putting something between you and what’s happening.

John Hoagland

Being able to capture candid photos of people is key to successful street photography. As was discussed in the prologue and will be covered more in another essay, not all street images have to be candid but candids are a staple of the art form.

Continue reading

Street Photography – Prologue

This man is a roving and impassioned daguerreotype that preserves the least traces, and on which are reproduced, with their changing reflections, the course of things, the movement of the city, the multiple physiognomy of the public spirit, the confessions, antipathies, and admirations of the crowd.

Victor Fournel, on the idea of the flâneur Continue reading

Cash Over Credibility

I’m thinking of starting a new photography group.  The name needs a bit of work but the gist is ‘The No Shill Group’.

It seems an increasing number of photographers are entering into affiliate relationships with as many companies as will have them, putting advertising all over their websites or have extensive product sponsorship arrangements. At the same time these photographers are, of course, ‘reviewing’ or otherwise writing about/promoting the gear or software. The net result is that it’s nearly impossible to determine when the comments being made are objective and can be trusted. Continue reading